Traditional recipes

Finally: Where to Toast to Spring in NYC this Weekend

Finally: Where to Toast to Spring in NYC this Weekend

New Yorkers say 'Cin-cin!' to warm weather with these springy cocktails

Sip Soogil’s The Korean Kiss in the East Village.

Temperatures are set to jump up into the 70s this weekend, which means it’s finally time to ring in spring here in New York City. Manhattan’s bartenders await with shakers and stirrers in hand, ready to serve you seasonally appropriate—and delicious—libations so here are a few standouts that are best sipped while wearing your new sandals:

Analogue | Sherry Up and Wait
The name of this drink is exactly how Mother Nature has been making us feel about spring, so it’s only appropriate we toast the season’s arrival with this Greenwich Village cocktail bar’s Sherry Up and Wait: gin, Amontillado sherry, grapefruit, lime, Benedictine, creme du banane, and bitters

De Maria | Shades of Green
Grab one of the sidewalk tables outside the NoLIta all-day restaurant that’s super stylish both inside and out and order a Shades of Green: tequila, mezcal, martinique rum, velvet falernum, kiwi, and lime.

Soogil | The Korean Kiss
After chowing down on asparagus salad and cod with zucchini noodles in this modern Korean boîte in the East Village, why not drink your dessert and order the colorful and flowery Korean Kiss: hibiscus-infused soju, raspberry juice, and egg white.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


Visit Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House and watch the fascinating process of turning Fresh Maple Sap into Pure Maple Syrup! Come, talk to a real sugarmaker and ask your maple questions during the maple sugaring season. Come see our sugarhouse and taste the sweet results! Ioka Valley Farm’s Sugar House is open to visitors whenever we are boiling, mid-February through early April. Weekend Sugar House Tours & Tastings, mid February - Early April!

Rob and his wife, Missy, revived the art of maple sugaring here at Ioka Valley Farm in 1992 with 13 taps and the kitchen stove. Today, we have 14,000 taps in the sugarbush behind our sugarhouse and lease another 4000 taps on another property. The flavor of our maple syrup comes from the fertile soils of the Berkshires.

All taps are on our pipeline tubing system using vacuum to promote maximum sap yield. The sap is first collected in our storage tanks. Sap comes into the releaser where the sap is released from the vacuum and pumped into our tanks. Our tubing system enables our sap to only be in contact with food grade or stainless steel materials throughout the entire production process.

Before we boil our sap we use reverse osmosis which is a filtration system that separates the pure water molecules one way and the larger sugar molecules the other. This brings our raw sap from 2% sugar content to a concentrate sap of about 15% sugar content. This is a HUGE energy saving step. We use a lot less oil (or wood) to boil our syrup.

Two modern boilers housed in the sugarhouse especially for the production of this sweet treat. Our small evaporator is a 2 X 6 wood fired evaporator that boils 50 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 1 gallon/hour. With the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration this evaporator would make over 8 gallons/hour.

Our large evaporator is a 5 X 16 oil fired evaporator that boils over 600 gallons/hour. So with raw 2% sap it would make just over 14 gallons/hour and with the sap concentrated to 15% sugar concentration is would make just over 100 gallons/hour.

When boiling maple syrup we know we have made maple syrup by watching the temperature and the density. Maple syrup is made at 7 ½ degrees Fahrenheit above the boiling point of water, which is around 217 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the day’s atmospheric pressure. The density is also checked for a final check which is measured in Brix. Hot maple syrup is 66.9 Brix for correct density.

We then filter our maple syrup through a filter press to remove the sugarsand. Sugarsand is the mineral deposits as a result of the evaporation process of boiling approximately 40 gallons down to 1 gallon of finished product. We do use the sugarsand from the filter press in the manure and spread it on the fields as fertilizer

As we make our maple syrup we filter and can our maple syrup into 40 gallon barrels for ease of storage. We will repack our maple syrup fresh throughout the year into smaller resale containers as needed.

We tap both hard and soft maple trees. We follow best management practices in forest management and sugaring guidelines. Our trees are 8 inches in diameter (making them approximately 40 years old) before we begin tapping them. When they reach 15 inches or more in diameter we will place 2 taps on that tree. With each tap we average approximately ⅓ of a gallon of finished maple syrup.

Our farm family continues to work hard at keeping our farm beautiful, productive, and to make our products to the highest quality possible now and for generations to come.


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