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Get Actual Music Studio Quality Sound With HDtracks Downloads

Get Actual Music Studio Quality Sound With HDtracks Downloads

Audiophiles spend thousands on the best stereo equipment, but if the quality of the actual music you're playing isn't very good, the gadgetry isn't going to help. HDtracks offers you high-quality downloads, promising that unlike other digital music stores, the don't compress the MP3 files, instead giving you the same quality you would find on a CD. They also supply you with a pdf of the cover art and liner notes, which will help when you can't figure out those Led Zeppelin lyrics.

You won't need any special equipment to play HDtracks AIFF files, since they'll even open up on iTunes, though they will take a bit longer to download in the first place because AIFF files are around 10 times bigger than standard MP3. Once you're done, the company recommends burning the music onto a CD to play on your home system, which would get you the most out of the music (most notably, tighter bass and cleaner sound).

There are many different ways to browse their catalogue, including organized lists of top records in certain genres, and the price is going to be around $25 an album. If you want to hear what your favorite singer hears in the studio, it's going to cost you a bit more, but we think it's totally worth it.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Lossless audio explained: sorting the FLACs from the ALACs

Thanks to the PC, the iPod and then the smartphone, the music world was once ruled by the 128kbps MP3 file. Our music was mobile, and heavily compressed, and to anyone who had been used to CD or vinyl, it sounded pretty terrible. Lossy MP3, WMA and AAC music ripped from CDs or downloaded was the way of things… until recently.

The rise of more advanced audio formats has signalled a new wave of music appreciation, raising the average listener's expectation of quality while giving committed audiophiles what they're always after: the chance to hear the most authentic recreations of their favorite songs and artists.

Cue a new dawn of music downloads and streaming services that deal in music as close to the original Studio Master as possible, usually referred to as lossless audio – or incorrectly confused with Hi-Res Audio. To avoid all confusion, we've run through exactly what these formats entail below.


Watch the video: How to download Lossless Hi-Res Music - FREE (December 2021).