Traditional recipes

Arizona Biltmore Showcases Frank Lloyd Wright’s Style in an Elegant and Historic Setting

Arizona Biltmore Showcases Frank Lloyd Wright’s Style in an Elegant and Historic Setting


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

After a multi-million dollar renovation in 2014 of the guest rooms and suites, spa, salon, and meeting spaces, the historic Arizona Biltmore, a Waldorf Astoria Resort, offers guests modern accommodations while preserving the distinctive design and architecture of the property.

Renovations included the Paradise, Garden, Valley Cottage, and Terrace Court rooms and suites. The new design includes a light brown color palette juxtaposed with contrasting dark wood colors. Bronze and gold metal accents provide vintage ambiance while light green glass tops on bureaus and plush easy chairs and sofas add a certain cozy, warm feeling.

The Arizona Biltmore was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright’s colleague Albert Chase McArthur and opened in 1929. Wright’s influence is apparent throughout the resort. The lobby is a museum of Wright-inspired design housing a gold leaf ceiling, barrel chairs with curved wooden backs, low-slung oak tables, and a contemporary stained glass window design.

Housed within the resort’s 39 acres are 740 guest rooms and the upscale Ocatilla 120-room boutique hotel. The 22,000-square foot spa includes a dry sauna, wet steam room, whirlpool, fitness center with daily classes, a full-service salon, and six tennis courts. The spa’s natural healing treatments include a wide variety of scrubs, facials, massages, and body wraps, as well as nail and hair care in the salon. Guests can even enjoy eight swimming pools and two 18-hole golf courses.

Guests can also choose from a variety of dining options. Honoring Frank Lloyd Wright and Albert Chase McArthur, Frank & Albert’s serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner in a casual setting with a cozy fireplace and al fresco patio dining. Dishes include lots of pizza and pasta choices, blackened salmon, vegetable risotto, scallops, short ribs, burgers, and skirt steak with a chipotle mash. Desserts include warm apple cobbler, butterscotch pudding, and tableside s’mores.

The resort’s signature restaurant, Wright’s at the Biltmore, offers contemporary American cuisine in an art-deco style setting. Deep orange leather booths, globe hanging light fixtures, and a floor-to-ceiling paneled window wall make the atmosphere upscale and comfortable. Diners can choose from a set five-course tasting menu or order a la carte. Dishes include smoked beef tartare with chorizo and saffron, salt-cured foie gras and fig, lobster bisque, beef wellington, sea bass with asparagus and crab, smoked gnocchi, and smoked tenderloin of bison. Desserts include a trio of soufflés, a dark chocolate spumoni torte, Bavarian cheesecake, and crème brûlée. Every table also received a nice sampling of cotton candy at the end of the meal.

For lighter fare, the Wright Bar offers a variety of signature cocktails, wines, whiskeys, and bourbons, as well as small bites including calamari, quesadillas, truffle mac and cheese, burgers, pizzas, and steak frites.

High tea is also offered and includes sandwich options like egg and cucumber, smoked salmon, lobster salad, chicken Waldorf, and melon and prosciutto, as well as scones and a variety of pastries.

The resort has also added a trio of new chefs, including Chris Vitanza as new Executive Pastry Chef, Brian Peterson as new Chef de Cuisine at Wright’s at the Biltmore, and Steve Sprague, who was promoted to Chef de Cuisine at Frank & Albert’s.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


A Sampling of Some of America's

Whatever happened to the Grand Old’ Resorts, those plush, self‐contained hotels on acres of well manicured grounds where guests stroll at leisure, play tennis and golf, dine in elegant surroundings, dance to live music and above all relax in style? Some of them have disappeared, but a number are still going strong, their usefulness becoming increasingly important as gasoline becomes scarcer. The resorts may be reached by plane, train, bus or boat (and possibly a taxi or limousine ride from the terminal), and once the traveler arrives at the hotel, further transportation is not needed. What follows is a sampler of some of the better known Grand Old Resorts, listed alphabetically, with details on facilities, activities, rates and travel directions.

THE ARIZONA BILTMORE, 24th Street and Missouri Avenue, P.O. Box 2290, Phoenix, Ariz. 85002 (602-955-6600 or 800-228-3000). Designed in 1929 by Frank Lloyd Wright, this distinctive hotel, built of concrete block with handcut frieze and copper roof, celebrated its golden anniversary in February. Its 318 guest rooms are set amid 32 acres of lawns, palms, cactus and flowers that are changed with the seasons. Lighted tennis courts, an Olympic‐size pool, a wading pool, a whirlpool, a sauna, cabanas, two dining rooms and a movie theater add to the facilities, and guests have access to two 18‐hole golf courses ($12 greens fee $6 golf‐cart rental), a putting green, a driving range, bicycle rentals ($1.50 an hour) and horseback riding. Card games, backgammon play and mountain hikes are also offered. Full‐length motion pictures are shown free on Friday and Saturday evenings, and there is dancing to live music every night in the main dining room (Gold Rnnm) and a cocktail lou.nge. A fancier dining room, the Orangerie, specializes in flambe dishes. The Gold Room offers meals ranging from fish to steak at a

Rates at the resort, which is open year round, vary according to the season. Until Sept. 15, the charge for one or two people in a room ranges from $30 to $50 a day without meals. A third adult may share a room for $6 a day. There is no extra charge for children under 19 years of age sharing a room with parents. Two meal plans are offered: $21 additional a person a day for two meals, $26 for three meals. Children are charged $15 a day for two meals, $19 for three.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3 a person one way) from Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix, a 20minute trip.

THE BREAKERS, South County Road, Palm Beach, Fla. 33480 (305-6556611). A survivor• of the once fabulous chain of Florida hotels established by Henry M. Flagler, the Breakers preserves its 1926 concrete and stucco resemblance to the Villa Medici in Rome, a design adopted after fire destroyed the oceanfront resort in 1925.

The nine‐story hotel with twin towers and some relatively recent additions, such as a ballroom, lounge and side units, contains 566 rooms. Indoor and outdoor pools, 12 tennis courts, two 18 hole golf courses, a putting green beach cabanas, a card room and shuf-

JOHN BRANNON ALBRIGHT is an editor on the staff of the Travel Section. fleboard, lawn bowling and volleyball courts are among other facilities. Also on the grounds are a drug store, a soda shop, a flower shop and a health club. Bicycles ($3 a day) and snorkeling equipment are available, and guests pitch horseshoes and play croquet and Ping‐Pong. Full‐length movies are shown on Sunday and Tuesday nights, bingo is played on Thursday nights, bridge on Fridays and theme parties (Caribbean goombay, Hawaiian luau) are given on alternating Saturdays. Organized activities are arranged for children, among them arts and crafts,swimming and diving competitions, scavenger hunts and sand‐castle building contests.

During the summer, dress is informal. Men are required to wear jackets at dinner but need not have a tie. Dancing to an orchestra accompanies every dinner in the Florentine Dining Room, where the cuisine is basically American. Full dinners are served at a fixed price ($14 for adults, $6 for children), and a la carte entrees (averaging $8 each) are also offered. Champagne brunch ($9 a person), served in the Beach Club, is a popular Sunday pastime.

Room rates without meals run from $19 to $30 a person a day in double occupancy until Oct. 1, and there is a $5 charge for a third person in a room. A meal plan (breakfast and dinner) is available for $18 additional a person day for adults, $12 for children. Some package plans are also available, such as a golf package costing $32.50 a per- son a day in double occupancy (standard), $42.50 a person a day in deluxe. Included are room, breakfast, greens fees and use of a golf cart. Guests booking the package for five days may stay a sixth day without additional charge.

The hotel is accessible by air through Palm Beach International Airport in West Palm Beach and by train and bus, also to West Palm Beach. The cab fare

The advantages of big vacation hotels with expanses of grounds and varied leisure activities grow clearer as gas grows scarcer. from the airport is about $8. Limousine service is available at $18 for two people.

THE BROADMOOR, Colorado Springs, Colo. 80901 (303-634-7711). The three Italian Renaissance‐style pink stucco buildings with red tile roofs that face manmade Cheyenne Lake in the foothills of the Rockies south of Pike's Peak contain virtually a city within a city. There are 560 guest rooms, 16 shops for clothing, gifts and souvenirs, a laundry, a dry cleaner, a gas station and a florist. There are three 18‐hole golf courses, three outdoor swimming pools, 16 tennis courts, two all‐year iceskating rinks, a stable, a conference hall, a theater, a skeet and trap-shoot- ing range, a ski slope, a zoo, a memorial to Will Rogers and a free shuttle bus to transport guests around the grounds.

Children are offered the servicesof a program director and are taken to the zoo, given art instruction and served in their own dining room. Paddle boats and canoes are available at the lake, and in the evening guests dance to live music and view full‐length movies.

Among the resort's myriad dining and drinking establishments are the Golden Bee, a reconstructed 18th-century English pub the Tavern, which evokes the atmosphere of a country inn the Penrose Room on the top floor of the Broadmoor South, which is named for Spencer Penrose, who founded the hotel in 1918, and where coat and tie are required after 6 P.M. the elegant Charles Court, where the decor is that of an English manor and tableside preparation the fashion Julie's, a confection parlor named for Mrs. Penrose, and Spec's Spot, a cocktail lounge that takes the founder's nickname and has a 1930's motif with murals on suede. The meal tab averages $4 for breakfast, $6 for lunch and starts at $8.50 for an a•la carte dinner entree.

Room rates range from $70 a day for one or two persons in the math hotel to $95 a day for one or two persons in Broadmoor West. There is no charge for children under 2 years of age charge of $3 a day is made for a rollaway bed. A penthouse suite with four . bedrooms and a parlor with a fireplace can accommodate up to eight persons and is $400 a day.

The Broadmoor is accessible by air from Peterson Field in Colorado Springs, where a shuttle bus is available for $7.50 a person. Limousine service is also available.

THE CLOISTER, Sea Island, Ga. 31561 (912-638-3611 or 800-841-3223). An absence of television sets is one distinction of this sprawling resort, which opened on Oct. 12, 1928, and now consists of 264 rooms in 14 buildings of Spanish Mediterranean design in a setting of semitropical foliage on an island off the coast of Georgia.

Cloister windows and Moorish arches are other distinctive features as are the five-mile-long beach, two outdoor swimming pools, 18 tennis courts, two 18‐hole golf courses ($13 greens fee) and a steam bath. Croquet, chipping and putting bicycling ($2 an hour), horseback riding, skeet and trap shooting, boating and shuffleboard are among the daytime activities, and at night there is dancing to an orchestra in the Clubrooms. On Sundays the dancing gives way to movies. Southern cooking and seafood predominate in the dining room, where coats and ties are required on certain nights. Guests also dress more formally on Mondays when dinner is served al fresco at the beach club.

Three complete meals a day are included in the rates, which until Nov. 30 range from $41 to $78 a person a day in double occupancy. The charge for third adult in a room is $28 a day. Children 6 to 12 sharing a room are charged $18 a day, those 3 to 5 are $15 a day and 2 and under $8 a day.

The resort is accessible by shuttle bus ($12 a person) from the Jacksonville, Fla., airport and may also be reached by train to Thalmann, Ga. It is also possible to fly to Atlanta, change to Air South to St. ‘Simons Island three miles from the hotel and be met by a hotel vehicle at the airstrip.

HOTEL DEL CORONADO, 1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado, Calif. 92118 (714-435-6611). This 91-year-old Victorian institution, with red conical roof and all‐wood construction, is preserved as a national historic landmark and is the only major oceanfront resort along the Pacific Coast north of Acapulco. Combined with two additions — a fouryear‐old tower unit and a poolside structure under construction — the hotel will soon offer a total of 671 rooms. It has an Olympic‐size freshwater pool, seven lighted tennis courts, two dining rooms and a courtyard landscaped with palm trees and oleanders.

Guests have a choice of boats for hire, ranging from sailboats and paddle boats to Cabin cruisers for deep‐sea fishing. Bicycles are also available ($1 an hour, $5 a day), and an 18‐hole municipal golf course ($5 greens fee) is within wa lking distance. Free guided tours are conducted at 1 P.M. every Saturday, and there is dancing to an orchestra every evening. Dress is casual jackets for men are required, ties optional. French‐style (white‐glove) service is offered in the Prince of Wales Grill where the a la carte Continental menu features a number of flambe dishes prepared in the atmosphere of a London townhouse. In the more traditional Crown‐Coronet Room, the fare tends toward American‐style entrees.

Rates range from $24.50 to $72.50 person a day in double occupancy. There is a charge of $5 a day for a third person in rooms having an extra bed if an additional bed is brought in, the charge is $10 a day. Two‐bedroom penthouse apartments are available at $350 a day. The resort is open the year round with no seasonal variation in rates. Meals, which are extra, range from about $5 for breakfast to $9.50 and up for dinner. Lunch averages $6.

The resort is accessible by limousine ($3.50 a person one way) from Lindberg Field, about 10 minutes away in downtown San Diego.

THE FRENCH LICK SHERATON, French Lick, Ind. 47432 (812-935-9381). Situated in Springs Valley in the Cumberland Hills, an area of mineral springs settled by French traders in the late 18th century and an attraction to animals that licked the wet rocks, the

The Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1929. present resort hotel dates from the 1890's when Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis, headed a syndicate that bought the property after the original buildings were destroyed by fire. One of Mr. Taggart's innovations was the bottling of Pluto Water, named for one of the springs. The resort was acquired by Sheraton in 1955

The hotel's 500 rooms are set among 3,000 wooded acres containing two 18hole golf courses, 25 lighted tennis courts, a skeet and trap‐shooting range, two swimming pools, extensive bridle paths, a standard gauge steam railroad offering an 18‐mile ride and separate health clubs for men and women with mineral baths, a sauna, a whirlpool and a steam room. Facilities for bowling and billiards are also maintained, and the hotel provides transportation to Patoka Lake where bass fishing is popular. For children there are magic shows, scavenger hunts and supervised pool parties.

A trio plays nightly in the dining room, and there is dancing and entertainment in the lounge every night but Sunday. Films are not shown at the hotel, but guests are given free tickets to the local cinema, which is within walking distance. The basically American cuisine concentrates on beef, ham, fried chicken and fish along with a cold buffet.

The rates, which cover room accommodations and three full meals a day, range from $44 to $48.50 a person a day in double occupancy. A third adult in room is charged $28.a day. There is no room charge for children in a room with their parents, but those up to years of age are assessed a meal charge of $2.70 a day. Those 5 to 12 are charged $13 a day for meals, and those 13 to 17 are charged $18 a day. Package plans are also available. One example: For. a rate of $63.50 a day, a tennis player traveling by himself receives room and board, two hours of court time, use of a ball machine and a coupon good for a round of golf. (The rate is $46.25 a person a day in double occupancy.)

The nearest airport is in Louisville, Ky. The ride to the hotel from the airport takes about an hour and costs $2 person when there is a full complement of passengers. Private planes may land at a 4,400‐foot airstrip at the resort.

GRAND HOTEL, Mackinac Island, Mich. 49757 (906-847-3331). For 92 years Grand Hotel, five stories tall and almost 900 feet long with 262 rooms and huge colonnaded veranda, has attracted summer visitors from throughout the world and preserved such traditions as high tea and proper attire.

Occupying 500 acres of the 2,000‐acre state park on the thre6mile‐long island, from which automobiles are banned, the majestic all‐wood structure crowns a high bluff and commands a view of Lake Huron, the Straits of Mackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the city of St. Ignace on Michigan's Upper Peninsula and Mackinaw City at the southern end of the bridge. Closer in are views of the island's Fort Mackinac, grassy and wooded slopes, the hotel's nine‐hole golf course, its three clay tennis courts, its swimming pool and sandy beach.

In lieu of motorized transport, bicycles ($1.50 an hour), horses ($8 an hour), drive‐yourself carriages ($15 an hour) and horse‐drawn taxis are available. High tea ($2.50) offers a choice of champagne or wine with finger sandwiches and French pastries, and evening finds guests dressing for dinner (jackets and ties for men, dresses or fancy pants suits for women), selecting from among eight different entrees, attending concerts, sipping complimentary coffee, dancing to an orchestra or listening to a guitarist until 2 A.M.

The hotel is open from mid‐May to the end of October. With three meals day, the rates range from $50 to $85 person. A third person in a room is charged $30 a day, and children between 6 and 12 years of age are charged $15 a day, those 5 and under, $8 a day.

The approach to the island is by ferry from Machinaw City or St. Ignace (about $4 round trip). Travelers may fly to Peliston, Mich., from Detroit or Chicago, then go by limousine ($6 a person) to Machinaw City.

GROSSINGER HOTEL & COUNTRY CLUB, Grossinger, N.Y. 12734 (914-292-5000, 212-563-3700 or, outside New York state, 800-431-8300). The out- growth of a seven‐room farmhouse purchased in 1913 by Selig Grossinger, an Austrian immigrant whose daughter Jennie suggested that the family take in boarders the next summer, Grossinger's has become synonymous with the all‐inclusive Catskills resort where evening “name” entertainment is as important to guests as outdoor recreation and three full meals a day.

Spread over 1,300 acres, Grossinger's has 600 guest rooms, three swimming pools, an 18‐hole and a nine‐hole golf course, a driving range, putting greens, 12 tennis courts, a private lake for boating and fishing, separate health clubs for men and women with saunas, whirlpool baths and steamrooms and facilities for Ping‐Pong, shuffleboard, basketball, boccie, volleyball, handball and horseshoe pitching. Although bicycles are not available, nearby stables pick up guests for horseback rides.

Noted for its kosher cuisine, the resort was once visited almost exclusively by Jews, but non‐Jewish guests now account for 30 percent of the clientele. The main dining room, where jackets for men are required on week, ends and holidays (ties optional), has a capacity of 1,500. Dancing to live music is part of each evening's routine, and there is a children's dining room as well as supervised play for children.

All rates are American plan (three meals). They range from $70.50 to $105 a person a day in single occupancy and from $47 to $70 a person a day in double occupancy and vary depending on the type of accommodations and the day of the week. A third or fourth person in a room is charged $15 to $43 a day, depending on age and the day of the week. Weekly and special package rates are also available.

Grossinger's is accessible by air to Sullivan County Airport in White Lake, eight miles away, and by bus from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in New York to the entrance gate. Guests ma telephone the hotel desk from there for free pickup by a small van.

THE MOUNT WASHINGTON HOTEL, Bretton Woods, N.H. 03575 (603-278-1000 or 800-258-0330). Established in 1902 and the site of the 1944 International Monetary Conference, this red‐roofed, 335‐room, all‐wood hotel gained national historic landmark status last October. The Gold Room, where sessions of the monetary conference were held, is no longer used, having been roped off to preserve it as a historic site.

Exuding Edwardian elegance, the hotel sits on a 10,000‐acre preserve in the heart of the White Mountain National Forest and overlooks 6,280‐foot Mount Washington and the Presidential Range. Guests have use of an 18hole golf course, 12 tennis courts, 50 miles of bridle paths, an indoor and an outdoor swimming pool and a sauna. There are also 900 feet of porches, a post office, a print shop, a laundry and a mile‐long Mountain Coaster, a newly installed fixed‐rail version of the toboggan‐like Alpine Slide.

An orchestra plays for dancing every night, and for the second year a discotheque is in operation. A nursery is maintained for children, and baby sitters are available. Organized hikes, putting contests and volleyball games for children are also offered.

Dress in the main dining room, where Continental cuisine prevails, informal, except that jackets are required after 6 P.M. Meals are also served in Fabyan's Station, a refurbished railroad station the Stickney Room, named for John Stickney, the hotel's founder, and Darby's Tavern.

Two meals a day — breakfast and dinner — are included in the rates, which range from $50 to $65 a day for one person in a room and from $45 tc $69 a person a day for two people in room. A third adult in a room is charged $25 a day. Children under 14 are charged $20 a day when sharing room with two adults, and family units, which accommodate three to five persons in two rooms and a bath, are $40 a person a day. Vacation packages are available. One five‐night package at $249.50 a person in double occupancy covers breakfast, dinner and lodging as well as two rounds of golf, four hours of tennis, a half‐day's bicycle rental, ar hour of horseback riding and dining room and housekeeping gratuities.

The resort, which is open from the last week in May to Oct. 15, may be reached by bus from Boston to Littleton, N.H., where the hotel meets guests in a van for a one‐way fee of $5 a person.

The foothills of the Rockies provide the background for the Broadmoor in Colorado Springs, Colo.


Watch the video: ΤΟ ΕΠΟΜΕΝΟ ΒΗΜΑ! Μετά το κάψιμο έδωσε εντολή για εξόντωση! Τα βρήκαν και ετοιμάζουν (June 2022).