Traditional recipes

WATCH: New Zealand Fish Leaps Out of Water to Eat Food Off Dry Land

WATCH: New Zealand Fish Leaps Out of Water to Eat Food Off Dry Land

Fish do not usually jump up for food, but this one did

Banded kokopu are known to wait for insects to fall into the water.

It’s not every day you see a fish out of water — literally! No, we don’t mean in the metaphoric sense, but a fish that physically propels itself out of the water.

But that’s just what two students and a professor from Northcote College in Auckland, New Zealand recently saw near a stream at Le Roys Bush, the public reserve where they were observing a population of banded kokopu population.

The fish, a species of whitebait native to New Zealand waters, was noticed jumping out of the water and onto the bank. Curious to see if the fish was in hunting mode, the students placed larvae on the bank and could not believe what happened next. The fish jumped out of the water and onto the bank to snatch the larvae before immediately throwing itself back into the stream!

According to the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, banded kokopu usually feed off of moths and flies that fall to the water’s surface, but obviously their experiment proves that the fish also don’t leave their meals to chance.

“It’s quite unique for fish to jump out of the water,” the attending professor Kit Hustler, told The North Times. “I don’t know how many do it, but I’d say it’s less than 20 globally.”

See this rare occurrence for yourself!


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.


A foodie's guide to salmon

There’s a saying in the seafood industry: the West eats cod, the East eats mackerel and everyone eats salmon. It’s not surprising that this pretty pink, suppertime all-rounder frequently polls as the world’s most popular fish. What other fish has the vibrant copper colour of wild Alaskan sockeye, covers 50 shades of trendy coral pink through all its varieties and can be salt cured and oak smoked to produce the taste sensation that is smoked salmon?

And yet, for a fish we eat so much of, most of us know very little about it. OK, we know if it&rsquos fresh, smoked or canned, we might even know whether it&rsquos farmed or wild but pushed a little further about the different varieties, its seasonality and even its sustainability and we&rsquore largely stumped.

So whether you&rsquore eating chinook or chum, sockeye or coho, here&rsquos a guide to salmon, exploring its different tastes and textures, recipe ideas and cooking tips and sustainable outlook. Because for some of us, life without salmon is unthinkable.

I&rsquoll cover the two main types of salmon &ndash wild-caught Pacific and its different varieties, and then farmed Atlantic. For each variety there are sustainable and non-sustainable salmon available. We always consider sustainably sourced salmon to be the better choice, no matter how delicious, or indeed how cheap, a non-sustainable piece of salmon might be. Careful choices by consumers protect salmon which in turn protects its habitat and everything in it.