Traditional recipes

America’s 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

America’s 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

According to an April 2015 report by IBISWorld, the Mexican restaurant industry in America (including Tex-Mex) brings in upwards of $38 billion annually, which reflects this nation’s love affair with tortillas and beans. Our 2016 ranking of the best places in America for Mexican food aims to bring you the crema de la crema of this category.

It wasn’t so long ago that “Mexican” food was represented in the United States largely by heaping platters of rice and refried beans along with enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a few hard-shell tacos on the side. We’ve come a long way since then. Today, most people realize that dishes like burritos, chimichangas, and quesadillas are more Tex-Mex than actual Mexican — not that there's anything wrong with Tex-Mex — and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore. Hard-shell tacos are also scarce in Mexico; soft-shell tacos enclosed in steamed or lightly griddled tortillas are much more the norm. And those tacos will typically be garnished with lime wedges, onions, cilantro, and sometimes fresh white cheese, not shredded lettuce and shredded Cheddar.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Spanish chef José Andrés’ consistently packed Oyamel in our nation's capital, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche (the corn fungus sometimes called Mexico's truffle), once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream.

To put together our 2016 list of the 50 best Mexican restaurants in America, we first looked at last year's list, which analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics. Best-of lists both in print and online supplemented those results, and after rounding the selection out with our personal favorites, we ranked the selections based on editorial discretion. The restaurants we feature mostly specialize in authentic Mexican fare, with little or no Tex-Mex on the menus (there are a few exceptions). Many of our 2015 favorites reappeared on the list, but new venues include Cala in San Francisco and Carnitas Uruapan in Chicago. One of the new restaurants we selected even snagged the number one spot this year.

Enjoy our 2016 ranking of America’s top 50 spots for Mexican, and if one is in your area, you might even be on the phone ordering some tacos by the end of this list.

Additional reporting by Dan Myers and Colman Andrews.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


America's 50 Best Mexican Restaurants

May 21, 2014— -- From a high-end restaurant in Chicago specializing in ribeye carne asada to a modest taqueria in Mountain View, Calif. serving some of the finest carnitas you’ll ever encounter, America has no shortage of great Mexican restaurants. Running the gamut from super-upscale to inexpensive and no-frills, we’ve rounded up the 50 best in America.

It wasn’t so long ago when “Mexican” food was best represented stateside by a heaping platter of rice and refried beans along with gloopy enchiladas covered in melted cheese, with maybe a couple hard-shell tacos on the side. But we’ve come a long way since then: today most people realize that the standard menu of burritos, chimichangas, quesadillas, and the like are in fact more Tex-Mex than authentic Mexican, and that once you head south of the border there’s a whole world of flavorful (and non-cheesy) possibilities to explore.

Thankfully, the cuisine of just about every region of Mexico is now well-represented in the American culinary landscape. Chef José Andrés’s consistently packed Oyamel, for example, is proof that our appreciation of the varied regional cuisines of Mexico has come a long way. Oaxaca-inspired dishes like chicken in rich mole sauce and quesadillas filled with huitlacoche, once hard to find in the U.S., are increasingly considered mainstream. And while authenticity is prized, some of the country’s most highly regarded chefs, like former pastry chef Alex Stupak and Oklahoma-born Rick Bayless, have also turned their attention and creativity to Mexican, which has become somewhat of a cuisine célèbre.

In order to assemble our ranking of America’s 50 best Mexican restaurants, we analyzed results from surveys we sent out to some of America’s leading culinary authorities, writers, and critics, used to assemble our rankings of America’s 50 Best Casual Restaurants and the 101 Best Restaurants in America. We supplemented those with best-of lists both in print and online, and rounded it out with our personal favorites from around the country. We also made sure to include restaurants that specialize in authentic Mexican fare while some Tex-Mex classics on the menu are acceptable if done really well, the main focus needs to be on true Mexican cuisine.

So come with us on a journey through Mexico’s culinary heritage, by way of Mexican restaurants in locations as unexpected as Tigard, Oregon and Memphis, Tennessee. A warning, however: by the time you get to #1, you’ll be starving.

50) Nuestra Cocina, Portland, Ore.

Husband-and-wife chefs Benjamin Gonzales and Shannon Dooley-Gonzales have collaborated on a restaurant with peasant-style Mexican cooking in a less-expected corner of the U.S., Southeast Portland. Flavors span the cuisine of Zacatecas in north-central Mexico to those of Vera Cruz on the eastern coast and Tampico to the north. Signature dishes include the tamarind-marinated grilled Mexican prawns, tacos de puerco, sopes de chorizo, cochinita pibil, and puntitas de res en chile chipotle, sautéed beef tips with chipotle, chayote squash, and refried beans.

49) Javier’s, Dallas

In the land where Tex-Mex is king, Javier’s in Highland Park serves authentic Mexican, focusing its upscale take on Mexico City fare. There’s mounted game on the walls, lest you forget that you are still in Texas. Javier’s is not necessarily a critic’s darling, yet it’s the go-to choice for locals when they’re tired of the flashy scene at nearby Mi Cocina — and one that’s outlasted many other Mexican upstarts since it opened more than 30 years ago.

Dan Myers is the Eat/Dine Editor at The Daily Meal. Follow him on Twitter @sirmyers . Additional reporting by Kristen Oliveri and Arthur Bovino.


Watch the video: Ο ΟΗΕ στέλνει εκατομμύρια Αφγανούς στην Ελλάδα - Να ανοίξουν όλες οι χώρες τα σύνορά τους (October 2021).