Traditional recipes

Consumer Group Warns of Aluminum in Bavarian Pretzels

Consumer Group Warns of Aluminum in Bavarian Pretzels

Watchdog group says Bavarian pretzels have too much aluminum

Wikimedia/ZeWrestler

A Bavarian consumer group is warning about excessive levels of aluminum in pretzels.

Bavaria’s famous pretzels might be carrying a bit too much metal, according to one consumer watchdog group that says one in five pretzels in Bavaria contains dangerous levels of aluminum.

According to The Local, the Bavarian Consumers Center is pushing to have bakers stop using aluminum pans to make their pretzels out of concerns for metal levels in the snacks. Bavarian pretzels are allowed a maximum of 10 milligrams of aluminum per kilogram of pretzels, but the BCC says they often test at much higher levels than that.

“Pretzels often contain too much aluminum,” said the BCC’s Daniel Krehl. The state health and food office has recorded aluminum levels of 156 milligrams per kilogram, which is more than 15 times over the legal limit.

The problem apparently occurs when the pretzels are sprayed with alkaline sodium lye, which gives them their signature shiny, golden crust. When the lye is sprayed over pretzels on an aluminum tray, it breaks up metal particles which then can go into the bread.

To combat the problem, the BCC is urging bakers to stop using aluminum trays for pretzels.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


American cuisine

American cuisine reflects the history of the United States, blending the culinary contributions of various groups of people from around the world, including indigenous Native Americans, African Americans, Asians, Europeans, Pacific Islanders, and Hispanic Americans.

Early Native Americans utilized a number of cooking methods in early American cuisine that have been blended with early European cooking methods to form the basis of what is now American cuisine. The European settlement of the Americas introduced a number of ingredients, spices, herbs, and cooking styles to the continent.

The various styles of cuisine continued expanding well into the 19th and 20th centuries, proportional to the influx of immigrants from many different nations this influx nurtured a rich diversity in food preparation throughout the country.

When European colonists arrived in Colonial America, they raised animals for clothing and meat in a similar fashion to what they had done in Europe. Their cuisine was based upon what they had consumed in Europe.

The American colonial diet varied depending on the region settled. Commonly hunted game included deer, bear, bison, and wild turkey. A number of fats and oils made from animals served to cook much of the colonial foods.

Prior to the American Revolution, New Englanders consumed large quantities of rum and beer, as maritime trade provided them relatively easy access to the goods needed to produce these items: rum was the distilled spirit of choice, as the main ingredient, molasses, was readily available from trade with the West Indies.

In comparison to the northern colonies, the southern colonies were quite diverse in their agricultural diet the growing season was longer.


Watch the video: Real German Pretzels Brezn, Because Oktoberfest Is Cancelled (January 2022).