Traditional recipes

The Ultimate Party Sandwich recipe

The Ultimate Party Sandwich recipe

  • Recipes
  • Ingredients
  • Meat and poultry
  • Pork

This is the ultimate crowd pleaser if you have a hoard of hungry men watching a match. You can also add mayo, mustard or even a sprinkling of balsamic vinegar.

33 people made this

IngredientsServes: 8

  • 1 (500g) loaf ciabatta, bloomer or baguette, halved lengthways
  • 60g butter, softened
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 80g grated Parmesan cheese
  • 1 cos lettuce, shredded
  • 450g sliced cooked ham
  • 450g sliced turkey breast
  • 450g sliced salami
  • 450g sliced mozzarella cheese
  • 450g sliced Edam or Gruyere cheese
  • 450g sliced mild Cheddar cheese
  • 2 tomatoes, sliced
  • 1 large onion, sliced
  • 1 (350g) tin pitted black olives, sliced
  • 1/2 (290g) jar mushrooms, drained and sliced
  • 1 green pepper, seeded and thinly sliced

MethodPrep:20min ›Cook:10min ›Ready in:30min

  1. Preheat your oven's grill. In a small bowl, mix together the butter and garlic. Spread garlic butter on both halves of bread, and sprinkle liberally with Parmesan cheese. Place in preheated oven until cheese is golden brown. Remove from oven and allow to cool slightly.
  2. On the bottom half of the bloomer, place a layer of lettuce. Alternating between meat and cheese, arrange layers of ham, turkey, salami, and the three cheeses. Add a layer of tomatoes, onion, black olives, mushrooms, green peppers and anything else you like. Place the remaining half of bread on top.
  3. Place the sandwich on a cutting board, and slice into individual servings.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(36)

Reviews in English (30)

by Jillian

Wow! This is one BIG sandwich. It's actually more of a hoagie or sub depending on where you're from but one thing's for sure - it's delicious. I have to laugh as if the addition of some lettuce, tomato and other assorted "veggies" could some how make this seem "healthy". But, you have to splurge once in a while and I guess it's not called the "Heart Stopper 2000" for nothin'! There was no way we could finish this by ourselves so I sent the rest to work with my husband and he told me the guys renamed this "The Widow Maker" - LOL!-08 Feb 2012


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7 Essential Rules for Crafting the Ultimate Sandwich

The best sandwich is up for debate—lobster rolls, grilled cheese, BLTs, Cubanos, monte cristos, po’ boys, and reubens are just some of the many strong contenders for the title—but when it comes to the best way to build a sandwich, that’s a matter of science (OK, and art).

Back in college, I had a part-time job making sandwiches at the campus deli. It was a responsibility I took pretty seriously, at least more so than studying for some of my exams. My wrap technique always produced taut bullets of layered meats and cheese, while the diamond-shaped crosshatch I’d perfected on the panini press was my own signature move. Even now, when running into former classmates, some of them still remember me as “that girl from the sandwich bar.”

It’s an accolade I wear with pride, because sandwiches are a mindset, as far as I’m concerned. There is an art and a lofty aesthetics to making them well, one that can be self-taught, although some folks just seem grasp it more innately than others.

I’m here today to give you my sandwich rules 101. Because even if I didn’t end up making much out of my humanities degree, I did come out of undergrad with a thesis-worthy argument on the do’s and don’ts of what to put between two pieces of bread.

1. The Sky Is Not the Limit

I hail from New York, where a diner or deli sandwich means a stack of sliced meat that can be measured in inches with a piece of soft rye on either side. As much as this appeals to my inner carnivore, I gotta say I’m not a fan of these skyscraper-like behemoths. Nor do I go for tall sandwiches that look like a stacked kabob turned on its end. You should be able to fit a sandwich in your mouth without having to open too wide. Anything more is kind of like playing Jenga—that tower is going fall apart and make a mess, eventually. So I’d like to entreat New York sandwich makers to take a look at our reuben. Modestly proportioned and neatly stacked, it comes to the mouth like a soulful kiss from one’s life partner and not like a sloppy makeout session with a fleeting summer romance. Get our Reuben Sandwich recipe—or our Kielbasa Reuben recipe, which follows much the same format and sticks to a similarly rational scale.

2. Choose Your Bread Wisely

All too often, I’ve seen great sandwich toppings ruined by the wrong choice of bread: delicate arugula and goat cheese dwarfed by a monster focaccia, or salty ham and melty cheese on a stoic, multigrain loaf. The bread you use should always complement what’s inside, both flavor-wise and in terms of texture and girth.

Save big, crusty breads for equally hefty toppings and don’t try to compensate for lavish meats and cheeses by choosing a health-conscious loaf. Oh, and remember that some breads make the sandwich, like with tortas, cubans, and cemitas. Those pretty much demand to be put on the specific rolls with which they share their names. Get our Mexican Torta with Rajas and Jack Cheese recipe.

3. Be an Architecture Buff

A sound sandwich relies on a sound structure, just like a building. If you try to construct it without a proper foundation, there’s a good chance that the whole thing might just fall to the ground. So here’s your basic blueprint:

  • Meats should always be on the bottom, since they’re generally the weightiest.
  • For cold sandwiches, cheese comes next (if it’s a hot sandwich, however, put it on top, so it has a chance to melt).
  • The center layer should be the lettuce or leafy greens, which act like a net that helps everything stay in place.
  • On top of that go your pickles, tomatoes, and other assorted vegetables, which should be carefully layered over the contours of everything beneath. (Bacon goes here too.)
  • Then spread your sauces or condiments onto the underside of the top layer of bread and let gravity help them work their way into everything beneath.
  • You can spread sauce on the bottom as well, although sometimes this can make things a little slippery for the meat.

Our ham and Camembert sandwiches recipe is great for nailing down this sandwich building technique. Get our Ham and Camembert Baguette Sandwich recipe.

4. Brush Up on Your Knife Skills (or Get a Good Slicer)

If I had to name one reason why restaurants and shops generally put together better sandwiches than anything you’d make at home, it’s because they pre-slice everything for optimal layering. And it’s not just the deli meats and cheeses, this applies to the vegetables, too. When chopping everything by hand at home, you’re more likely to cut everything unevenly and too thick, resulting in pieces that just kind of wiggle around and fall out. Get a good sharp knife and try to make slices that are nice and thin, or better yet, use a mandoline.

Mueller Austria V-Pro Multi Blade Adjustable Mandoline Slicer, $34.97 from Amazon

Thin, precise slices are easy with this tool (just watch your fingers).

This will help create a more compact and evenly layered sandwich. On sandwiches like this one with apple and cheddar, careful slicing is all the more important to maintaining its layered structure. Get our Apple and Aged Cheddar Grilled Cheese recipe.

5. Be One with the Sauce

The easiest way to kill a sandwich is with too much sauce. While it can be the thing that takes a sandwich from humdrum to fantastic, especially if your ingredients are on the dry side, it can also overwhelm everything else and wreak havoc on the architecture of the sandwich, turning the bread to mush. So use it moderately, and if you’re not going to eat your sandwich right away, pack it separately to keep your bread fresh. Or if you do want to go all out, serve the sauce on the side—there are some sandwiches, like the French Dip, that were made for dunking and slathering. Get our French Dip Sandwich recipe.

6. Mine the Contents of Your Fridge

I don’t buy ingredients from the deli counter all that often to put on sandwiches at home. They are often bland and salty, or pricey, or sometimes a combination of both. So while I might leave sliced pastrami to the pros, I do love to use up odds and ends from my leftovers to make hodgepodge-y sandwiches. Last night’s roast chicken or those leftover bits of steak are way more flavorful than anything you could get from the sliced meats section. Or you can take some inspiration from recipes like our spicy meatloaf sandwiches, which revamp those dinner extras with some condiments and spice. Get our Spicy Meatloaf Sandwich recipe.

7. Keep It Simple

Most fully-loaded sandwiches simply end up in overkill territory, with a few rare exceptions (like the chivito, Uruguay’s everything-and-the-kitchen-sink monster). Since a sandwich forces you to take in all of its flavors at once, you don’t want to have too much going on. Instead of trying to figure out how many ingredients you can fit inside like a clown car, it’s better to focus on one or two core flavor pairings, like matching your meat to a cheese or a flavored spread, then perhaps adding on a couple other low key toppings based around that. This smoked duck, cherry, and gorgonzola sandwich is a great example, which places its sole focus on the way the smoke interacts with the sweetness of the cherries and the salty tang of the cheese. Get our Smoked Duck and Cherry Pressed Sandwich recipe.

See all our sandwich recipes for more, and get extra pointers on a childhood fave:


How to make the ultimate sandwich

Tom Shingler sits down with Max Halley at his acclaimed sandwich shop in north London to unearth the art and science behind creating a perfect sandwich.

Tom Shingler is the editor of Great British Chefs.

Tom Shingler is the editor of Great British Chefs.

Having ‘a passion for sandwiches’ sounds like the sort of blurb you’d read on a pretty average café’s website. But the second you talk to Max Halley, you realise it’s a thing that actually does exist beyond the realms of PR hyperbole.

Perhaps it’s his chef background – Max learnt how to cook in the kitchens of London restaurants such as Arbutus, LeCoq and Brindisa before deciding to open Max’s Sandwich Shop in Crouch Hill, London back in 2014. Three years later, he’s won awards from the likes of Observer Food Monthly for his quirky – borderline obsessive – mission to take the sandwich from a quick, easy and boring lunch option to a gourmet dish that just happens to be between two slices of bread. Max and his small team in an even smaller kitchen now serve around 1,000 sandwiches a week, with up to 400 people visiting the shop on Saturdays.

But why sandwiches? Max has obviously got the skills needed to create a tasty plate of food, and most of us still see a sandwich as a glorified snack or the path of least resistance when we’re hungry and busy. ‘I only had enough money when I started out to pay for myself, one front of house and another person in the kitchen,’ he says. ‘So I needed something we could spend all day cooking, and then during service just put together. Sandwiches fit the bill, plus you don’t need cutlery or plates to serve them, so there’s no need for loads of washing up. Also, I felt like no one else owned the sandwich – it kinda maxed out at Pret a Manger, which did a great job of putting a genuinely decent sandwich on the high street, but it still had all those convenience food, supermarket packet vibes.’

Max’s sandwiches are as far as you can get from a fridge-cold deep fill chicken and bacon. Take his signature Ham, Egg ‘n’ Chips, for example – stuffed with slow-cooked ham hock, a fried egg, shoestring fries, piccalilli and malt vinegar mayo, served hot and about the size of a house brick. Or his current vegetarian option, The Bhaji Smuggler, comprised of carrot bhajis, a coriander, green chilli and peanut salsa, yoghurt, sweet herbs, pickles, spinach and Bombay Mix. There are always four on the menu and cost £8.50 a pop but, unlike cheaper sandwiches that can be wolfed down for an uninspired work lunch, these behemoths leave you stuffed and satisfied – just like a decent meal at a restaurant.


40 tasty sandwich fillings and recipes

Jessica Dady April 14, 2021 8:39 pm

If you’re in need of some inspiration when it comes to what to put in your sandwich, we’ve got plenty of tasty, yet simple sandwich fillings to choose from.

We’ve rounded up our best sandwich fillings. Our fillings include cranberry and cheese toasties, salmon and scrambled egg bagels and BBQ chicken baguettes.

Our selection of delicious fillers varies from baguette fillings, open sandwiches, and wraps too. Most of these sandwiches would suit being served as part of a picnic spread, as a party food idea, or simply as a healthy lunch.

Making sandwich fillings from scratch is not only a healthier option than shop-bought sandwiches but can often save you money too.

Our quick and easy recipe for hummus and tomato wraps, which you can see being made in the video above, is one of our favourite sandwich fillings. It takes just 10 minutes of your time to make this mouth-watering combo of creamy hummus and sweet tomatoes.

For more of our hearty and delicious sandwich filling ideas see below…


Ultimate Club Sandwiches for a Crowd

Save

Hey friends! Coming at you here with a quick and easy recipe for Ultimate Club Sandwiches for a Crowd and it happens to be the first day of school (probably second by the time I hit publish). My house is super quiet and as clean as it gets – which is pretty clean unless you open a drawer or look under a bed.

I do have one little boy who was bummed to find himself home sick on the first day of school, but things are looking better already so we’re just taking this day super slow together. So while he’s snoozing the morning away snuggled up next to me, I thought I’d pop in and share this shortcut for making 12 crowd-pleasing sandwiches super quickly! These might come in handy if you are serving lunch poolside for some friends, or even to take along on a picnic or road trip.

These little guys have turkey, ham, cheddar, bacon, lettuce, and avocado. I also brushed the sliced rolls with a garlic butter before toasting them until golden brown. You can definitely swap out the ingredients and toppings to suit your own family’s preference, but watch the video to see how easily these come together!

Did you make this recipe?

Please let me know how it turned out for you! Leave a comment below and share a picture on Instagram with the hashtag #lovelylittlekitchen

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Try a new, great sandwich recipe today for better brown-bagging or simple dinners.

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7 Essential Rules for Crafting the Ultimate Sandwich

The best sandwich is up for debate—lobster rolls, grilled cheese, BLTs, Cubanos, monte cristos, po’ boys, and reubens are just some of the many strong contenders for the title—but when it comes to the best way to build a sandwich, that’s a matter of science (OK, and art).

Back in college, I had a part-time job making sandwiches at the campus deli. It was a responsibility I took pretty seriously, at least more so than studying for some of my exams. My wrap technique always produced taut bullets of layered meats and cheese, while the diamond-shaped crosshatch I’d perfected on the panini press was my own signature move. Even now, when running into former classmates, some of them still remember me as “that girl from the sandwich bar.”

It’s an accolade I wear with pride, because sandwiches are a mindset, as far as I’m concerned. There is an art and a lofty aesthetics to making them well, one that can be self-taught, although some folks just seem grasp it more innately than others.

I’m here today to give you my sandwich rules 101. Because even if I didn’t end up making much out of my humanities degree, I did come out of undergrad with a thesis-worthy argument on the do’s and don’ts of what to put between two pieces of bread.

1. The Sky Is Not the Limit

I hail from New York, where a diner or deli sandwich means a stack of sliced meat that can be measured in inches with a piece of soft rye on either side. As much as this appeals to my inner carnivore, I gotta say I’m not a fan of these skyscraper-like behemoths. Nor do I go for tall sandwiches that look like a stacked kabob turned on its end. You should be able to fit a sandwich in your mouth without having to open too wide. Anything more is kind of like playing Jenga—that tower is going fall apart and make a mess, eventually. So I’d like to entreat New York sandwich makers to take a look at our reuben. Modestly proportioned and neatly stacked, it comes to the mouth like a soulful kiss from one’s life partner and not like a sloppy makeout session with a fleeting summer romance. Get our Reuben Sandwich recipe—or our Kielbasa Reuben recipe, which follows much the same format and sticks to a similarly rational scale.

2. Choose Your Bread Wisely

All too often, I’ve seen great sandwich toppings ruined by the wrong choice of bread: delicate arugula and goat cheese dwarfed by a monster focaccia, or salty ham and melty cheese on a stoic, multigrain loaf. The bread you use should always complement what’s inside, both flavor-wise and in terms of texture and girth.

Save big, crusty breads for equally hefty toppings and don’t try to compensate for lavish meats and cheeses by choosing a health-conscious loaf. Oh, and remember that some breads make the sandwich, like with tortas, cubans, and cemitas. Those pretty much demand to be put on the specific rolls with which they share their names. Get our Mexican Torta with Rajas and Jack Cheese recipe.

3. Be an Architecture Buff

A sound sandwich relies on a sound structure, just like a building. If you try to construct it without a proper foundation, there’s a good chance that the whole thing might just fall to the ground. So here’s your basic blueprint:

  • Meats should always be on the bottom, since they’re generally the weightiest.
  • For cold sandwiches, cheese comes next (if it’s a hot sandwich, however, put it on top, so it has a chance to melt).
  • The center layer should be the lettuce or leafy greens, which act like a net that helps everything stay in place.
  • On top of that go your pickles, tomatoes, and other assorted vegetables, which should be carefully layered over the contours of everything beneath. (Bacon goes here too.)
  • Then spread your sauces or condiments onto the underside of the top layer of bread and let gravity help them work their way into everything beneath.
  • You can spread sauce on the bottom as well, although sometimes this can make things a little slippery for the meat.

Our ham and Camembert sandwiches recipe is great for nailing down this sandwich building technique. Get our Ham and Camembert Baguette Sandwich recipe.

4. Brush Up on Your Knife Skills (or Get a Good Slicer)

If I had to name one reason why restaurants and shops generally put together better sandwiches than anything you’d make at home, it’s because they pre-slice everything for optimal layering. And it’s not just the deli meats and cheeses, this applies to the vegetables, too. When chopping everything by hand at home, you’re more likely to cut everything unevenly and too thick, resulting in pieces that just kind of wiggle around and fall out. Get a good sharp knife and try to make slices that are nice and thin, or better yet, use a mandoline.

Mueller Austria V-Pro Multi Blade Adjustable Mandoline Slicer, $34.97 from Amazon

Thin, precise slices are easy with this tool (just watch your fingers).

This will help create a more compact and evenly layered sandwich. On sandwiches like this one with apple and cheddar, careful slicing is all the more important to maintaining its layered structure. Get our Apple and Aged Cheddar Grilled Cheese recipe.

5. Be One with the Sauce

The easiest way to kill a sandwich is with too much sauce. While it can be the thing that takes a sandwich from humdrum to fantastic, especially if your ingredients are on the dry side, it can also overwhelm everything else and wreak havoc on the architecture of the sandwich, turning the bread to mush. So use it moderately, and if you’re not going to eat your sandwich right away, pack it separately to keep your bread fresh. Or if you do want to go all out, serve the sauce on the side—there are some sandwiches, like the French Dip, that were made for dunking and slathering. Get our French Dip Sandwich recipe.

6. Mine the Contents of Your Fridge

I don’t buy ingredients from the deli counter all that often to put on sandwiches at home. They are often bland and salty, or pricey, or sometimes a combination of both. So while I might leave sliced pastrami to the pros, I do love to use up odds and ends from my leftovers to make hodgepodge-y sandwiches. Last night’s roast chicken or those leftover bits of steak are way more flavorful than anything you could get from the sliced meats section. Or you can take some inspiration from recipes like our spicy meatloaf sandwiches, which revamp those dinner extras with some condiments and spice. Get our Spicy Meatloaf Sandwich recipe.

7. Keep It Simple

Most fully-loaded sandwiches simply end up in overkill territory, with a few rare exceptions (like the chivito, Uruguay’s everything-and-the-kitchen-sink monster). Since a sandwich forces you to take in all of its flavors at once, you don’t want to have too much going on. Instead of trying to figure out how many ingredients you can fit inside like a clown car, it’s better to focus on one or two core flavor pairings, like matching your meat to a cheese or a flavored spread, then perhaps adding on a couple other low key toppings based around that. This smoked duck, cherry, and gorgonzola sandwich is a great example, which places its sole focus on the way the smoke interacts with the sweetness of the cherries and the salty tang of the cheese. Get our Smoked Duck and Cherry Pressed Sandwich recipe.

See all our sandwich recipes for more, and get extra pointers on a childhood fave:


The 20 best sandwich recipes

A bold boast maybe, but we proudly stand by it. Presenting 20 of the world’s best sandwiches by some its best food writers and cooks. Maybe start here: Pierre Koffmann’s croque monsieur! The definitive recipe for France’s finest sandwich by one of her greatest chefs. Add James Cochran’s buttermilk chicken, Rick Stein’s grilled mackerel baguette, Giorgio Locatelli’s Milanese panini and Claridge’s posh tea selection. We humbly offer Uyen Luu’s crispy pork belly bahn mi, Georgina Hayden’s halloumi, Signe Johansen’s fish finger sandwich, and the sweet perfection that is Claire Ptak’s peanut butter and jelly. Trust us. Your working-from-home lunch will never be the same again.


Watch the video: Macaroni and Cheese Recipe. How to Make Mac and Cheese (January 2022).