Traditional recipes

New York and London with Ferran Adrià

New York and London with Ferran Adrià

He's a nice guy, but don't mention peppers.

Colman Andrews and Ferran Adria

When my biography of the Ferran Adrià, the celebrated—legendary is probably not too strong a word—chef-proprietor of El Bulli in northeastern Spain, was published this fall in New York (by Gotham Books) and London (by Phaidon), Adrià himself agreed to help me promote it, submitting to on-stage "conversations" with me and sitting still for numerous shared interviews in both cities. (A record of the London event will be posted soon on Phaidon's Web site; the New York conversation has been YouTubed in its entirety.)

Because I'd spent a good year-and-a-half with and around Adrià while I was researching the book — published in America as Ferran: The Inside Story of El Bulli and the Man Who Reinvented Food and in the U.K. as Reinventing Food: Ferran Adria: The Man Who Changed the Way We Eat — I wasn't surprised by much during our mini book tour. I was already used to his casual dress, his modesty, his gregariousness, and his ability to respond to simple questions so complexly and at such length that it may not ever occur to his interrogators that the question he finally answered wasn't necessarily the question they'd asked.

What did surprise me a little, since I'd never had the opportunity to see it demonstrated so constantly, was his imperturbability — which is to say the patience and humor with which he responded (however obliquely) to even the most dunderheaded questions. And what I think surprised some of our dining companions on both sides of the Atlantic was his taste in food.

They watched as he politely ate, without a comment, the overwrought post-nouvelle cuisine at one of London's hottest restaurants, and then tore with gusto into a simple roasted chicken at a much simpler place; they noted the lack of enthusiasm with which addressed some meet-the-contract sushi in Manhattan, and then his broad grin at a juicy hamburger.

And they shook their heads in disbelief when he announced that the one foodstuff he can't abide is the bell pepper, green or red. "It's not the pepper's fault, it's mine," he told us one day. "If there is even a little piece of bell pepper at the edge of a paella, the whole dish is ruined for me." For more insight into Adrià, here are two radio interviews I did about him after he'd left town.


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."


El Bulli chef to launch cultural foundation

The world's greatest chef is looking for a dog. But Ferran Adrià, the 51-year-old who closed down his legendary El Bulli restaurant in 2011, is not seeking a four-legged companion for his retirement.

Adrià is now busy cooking up a new venture, with help from six top business schools: a cultural foundation designed to keep El Bulli's name alive for another century. In typically meticulous style, he knows what kind of dog he wants to be the model for its logo.

It must be a French bulldog, similar to the pets that, back in 1964, were the inspiration for Marketa and Hans Schilling's beachside bar, overlooking a charming Mediterranean cove in Spain's north-east corner, which Adrià later turned into a global legend.

"I will hold casting sessions in New York, London, Madrid and Barcelona if necessary," said the man who was voted the world's best chef by Restaurant magazine a record five times.

The global search for the perfect logo for a foundation dedicated to innovation, high cuisine and the pursuit of happiness is the sort of thing only a man as brilliant, barmy and wedded to perfection as the Catalan chef could think up.

Adrià is now entering this new phase of his life with the same high-octane approach that fuelled a gastronomic revolution. "I decided to get out of the restaurant star system," said Adrià, whose 2010 announcement came as El Bulli stood at the top of the world restaurant rankings. "But El Bulli never closed. It is simply being transformed."

Adrià is used to getting his way and has a canny ability to pull in free talent. His restaurant ran off the back of dozens of stagiaires – a form of advanced intern – from around the world who queued up for a chance to be in his kitchen.

He has now persuaded half a dozen of the world's best business schools to pitch ideas for the foundation project. Then he asked a group of number-crunching, marketing-minded students from Barcelona's IESE business school – one of the world's top 10 – to help him draw up his own plan, before raiding the others for ideas he might have missed.

Given that business school papers on El Bulli – from Harvard and elsewhere – regularly pointed out that it made little or no money, that seems especially daring.

Presenting the results at IESE, Adrià said the project's shape was now 95% settled – though the exhilarated but exhausted business students said it had changed radically from day to day.

A museum and visitor centre themed around his restaurant and the history of gastronomy is to be called El Bulli 1846. "This reflects both the 1,846 El Bulli dishes we have catalogued and the year that Auguste Escoffier, who is the most important chef in history, was born," he said.

He hopes that some 200,000 people a year will come, including gastronomes who have dined at the world's latest number one restaurant, El Celler de Can Roca, in nearby Girona.

Two separate projects will see him publish an ambitious online encyclopedia of gastronomy called Bullipedia, while the chef who famously blew up tomatoes with a foot pump, and continues to experiment radically, will broadcast his results on the internet in a project called El Bulli DNA.

"I have never stopped being a chef and I will get back to the kitchen with El Bulli DNA," he said. "El Bulli created a new way of looking at gastronomy and our idea is to keep that going."

Bullipedia will track the greatest developments in gastronomy. "We won't be putting up the 5,000 cakes you can find on Google, but the 30 cakes that have marked the history of the evolution of chocolate cakes," he explained.

For those lucky enough to have eaten at El Bulli – where Adrià refused to charge more than €250 (£200) a head, though many would have paid 10 times that much – the idea of it becoming a hybrid museum and research centre may be shocking.

It is housed in one of Spain's few protected Mediterranean beaches, the spectacular Cala Montjoi. Some would rather the spot remained a secret accessible to a few. "The great thing is that it will now be open to many more people," Adrià said.

That does not mean everyone will get a mouthful of Adrià's legendary food – previously available to just 8,000 diners a year at the 50-seater restaurant. Just as visiting FC Barcelona's museum does not involve playing football, so the eating at El Bulli will be minimal.

He will auction off meals to build up a multi-million-euro endowment designed to keep him, and his foundation, free from outside interference. "For the moment, we don't have to worry if income does not match costs, because I will cover it," he said. "Through donations, ticket income and other things, we will eventually build the endowment." A Japanese businessman recently bid €28,000 for one meal.

The El Bulli Foundation will draw inspiration, he says, from such varied sources as the Cirque du Soleil circus, fellow Catalan madcap Salvador Dali and his museum in nearby Figueres, and MIT's Media Lab.

Friends helping him set itup include former Tate Modern boss Vicente Todoli. "I don't believe in boards," Adrià said. "I believe in sitting down with friends and sharing ideas over food or beer."