Traditional recipes

More Cooking Destruction: How to Grill an iPad

More Cooking Destruction: How to Grill an iPad

More iPad cooking videos emerge — grilling an Apple product just in time for summer

Warning: grilling iPads causes a fiery mess.

First, it was the Germans who thought it'd be fun to toss their iPads in the dishwasher, in boiling water, and in a blender. Now, the guys at Pork Barrel BBQ have outdone them all with an iPad grilling video. The barbecue joint (located in Alexandria, Va.) launched a new "Can You Grill It?" series in which they take on very serious grilling subjects: mainly, how long it takes to grill an Apple product to medium-rare. (Answer? Three minutes — but it looks pretty crispy to us.) Check out the hilarity below, and the videos that inspired the madness.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.


Grilled Mahi Mahi: It’s What’s for Dinner

By Nancy Loseke

Anyone interested in eating sustainable seafood is likely acquainted with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch, a nonprofit organization located in Monterey Bay, California.

Whenever seafood appears on the menu of one of his shows, whether Project Fire or Project Smoke, we check the Watch to make sure the fish is on the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” list. That means the population of a certain species is well managed and caught or farmed in ways that cause little harm to habitats or other wildlife. You can even download an app to your iPhone or iPad, one you can easily consult when you’re at your local seafood or sushi counter.

One species we’ve been enjoying on the grill this summer is mahi mahi (also called dorado, pompano, or dolphinfish). It is one of the Aquarium’s “Best Choice” picks. Firm, meaty, and mild-tasting, the fish is a natural on the grill, especially when cooked over a wood or wood-enhanced fire. (One common misconception is that mahi mahi, Hawaiian for “very strong,” is a dolphin like the beloved “Flipper.” It is not. In fact, it is not even a mammal.)

Mahi mahi is usually sold as fillets or steaks an inch or more thick. They can replace swordfish, shark, salmon, tuna, grouper, or other firm-fleshed fish in recipes. Generally speaking, they will take 4 to 6 minutes per side over high heat. It can be cubed to make kebabs or tacos, and is compatible with a variety of seasonings and sauces, everything from Ember-Roasted Salsa to Chimichurri to compound butters. It takes well to marinades, too. Or can be cooked in banana leaves with a seasoning paste.